Testing Positive: Jim’s Story

Tuesday, November 24th, 2015 in Personal Stories - Men, Testing Positive

People living with HIV

Testing Positive

A main barrier to some people taking an HIV test is fear of a positive result and the impact it might have on their lives.

In support of National HIV testing week 21st – 28th November 2015, Positively UK aims to remove the fear of testing and worry of a positive result.

During national testing week we will be sharing the stories of seven men and women who have had the HIV test and received a positive diagnosis.

We hope this diverse range of experiences will reduce the anxiety some people may have about testing and will enable those who may test HIV positive to seek support to live well with HIV.

Jim’s Story

It was early in 2014 and I was living in Brazil. One night when going to bed, I discovered a rash all over my upper body. The doctor I saw there didn’t seem to know what it was despite taking a blood test. The rash didn’t go away so eventually I decided to fly back to the UK and go straight to the sexual health clinic for tests.

To be honest, I felt a sense of relief when I got the result. I’d been feeling anxious for nearly 6 weeks wondering what was wrong with me and although it was a big shock, it was good to finally have a firm diagnosis. The rash turned out to be syphilis and was easily treatable. The sensitivity in the way the clinic handled telling me about the HIV was exemplary. I couldn’t have been in better hands.

After walking out of the clinic I was meant to meet a friend who worked nearby but he was stuck in a meeting so I went to the pub and had a stiff drink. This probably wasn’t the best idea after a shot of penicillin and by the time my friend arrived, I was shaking and feverish. He sent me back to his in a cab and joined me after work. Another friend came over and between them, they helped me through those first difficult hours.

I’ve always been a very open and honest person and so I wanted to tell my family and friends. I was amazed and grateful for the support and understanding I received from every single one of them. Not a single bad reaction, which I guess surprised me. I also attended a recently diagnosed workshop with charity Positively UK who provided so much help with those questions about day to day living with HIV. Meeting others in a similar situation was invaluable in helping me realise that I wasn’t alone in the feelings I was experiencing.

Treatments have developed so fast in the last few years, whereas public awareness hasn’t kept pace with the realities of living with HIV today. Before I was diagnosed I knew it wasn’t a death sentence, but I had no idea about undetectable viral loads and that modern treatments effectively make you healthy and uninfectious.

I think if more people realised that it’s possible to live a completely normal life with HIV, then attitudes to the virus would really start to shift.

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