Testing Positive: Chris’s Story

Friday, November 27th, 2015 in Personal Stories - Men, Testing Positive

People living with HIV

Testing Positive

A main barrier to some people taking an HIV test is fear of a positive result and the impact it might have on their lives.

In support of National HIV testing week 21st – 28th November 2015, Positively UK aims to remove the fear of testing and worry of a positive result.

During national testing week we will be sharing the stories of seven men and women who have had the HIV test and received a positive diagnosis.

We hope this diverse range of experiences will reduce the anxiety some people may have about testing and will enable those who may test HIV positive to seek support to live well with HIV.

Chris’s Story

In 1992, I became unwell: nothing specific, but losing weight. At that time I was not considered to be in a ‘high risk’ group, straight, professional, white – so I was tested for meningitis, appendicitis, even obscure tropical diseases (my work had taken me to countries with high HIV prevalence). Eventually a doctor ordered tests for ‘everything’ the results came back: I was HIV positive. I didn’t know much, but I knew there was no treatment. It was devastating not just for me, but for my wife and my family. These days I know an HIV test would have been offered to me much earlier, and that the treatment is by and large, highly effective and highly tolerable. We have come a long way in a short time.

After testing, my health quickly went downhill, I was given an AIDS diagnosis almost immediately and was seriously unwell. I think I was saved by the anti-retroviral treatments in 1996 and the love of my wife and family and the grace of god and the NHS. I was given the best of care, free and with access to the latest drugs. In those days the drugs rapidly become useless as resistance set in, unlike the modern drugs, which give you a number of treatment options.

There is hope now. I can remember, before treatment, telling my doctor that I was trying to stop smoking, and her reaction was did I really want to stop? She knew that the future was bleak, even stopping smoking was a bit pointless. After the ARV’s kicked in in the mid 90’s I signed up for a physical rehab course at a gym in my hospital. Two nurses had to help me get to the gym. Today I regularly train and am fit enough to train others in the noble art of boxing.

For my age, for any age, I’m fit and well. HIV is something I have to stay on top of; take my meds regularly and engage with my HIV doctor, but it doesn’t stop me from doing anything I set my mind to. Now there is lots of hope, effective treatment and I have a healthy spiritual outlook… and I’ve quit smoking!

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